Vincent Tourraine
Reblog

Octobre 2017

San Francisco: now with more dystopia

I visited San Francisco for the first time in a year last week. Someone turned up the dystopian dial 20% while I was away. I stayed in a hotel downtown. At about ten on the night I arrived I decided to walk to a wine bar for a glass of California Pinot Noir. I walked six blocks to get there.

On American Identity, the Election, and Family Members Who Support Trump

There were so many disturbing moments in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election that it’s difficult to identify any particular one as the worst.

William Gibson's New Graphic Novel, 'Archangel,' Takes Nuclear Anxiety to Its Terrifying End

Like a lot of children of the 1950s, William Gibson grew up haunted by the specter of the atomic bomb, and enthralled by science fiction stories.

UI Design for iPhone X: Top Elements and the Notch

In the same spirit as the first post (UI Design for iPhone X: Bottom Elements), this post will deal with designing for the iPhone X. I use findings in our own apps in some of the examples. You can’t talk about this topic without first addressing the controversy the notch has caused.

Ted Chiang’s science fiction wins piles of awards. When he publishes, which is hardly ever.

Ted Chiang is frozen in thought. A bright-orange clementine sits half-peeled in his hands. My tape recorder, parked on the dining-room table of his home in a quiet, woodsy suburb of Seattle, vacuums up five seconds of silence, now ten, now 15.

Design Details: Drag and Drop

The technical underpinnings of drag and drop are provided by Apple in UIKit but much of how using it looks and feels is in the hands of app developers. Ideally, experiences that users have in one app should stand to benefit them in others.

Rafik Djoumi : "Game of Thrones, ce n'est guère que du Dune revisité"

Depuis plus de quatre ans, le magazine BiTS, diffusé sur arte.tv , analyse la pop-culture sous tous les angles.

Cyberpunk Cities Fetishize Asian Culture But Have No Asians

The grimy, glitched-out world we saw in Blade Runner is back and beautifully remastered. As the title conveys, Blade Runner 2049 picks up decades after the original film—a sort of post-post-apocalypse, more vividly, and terrifyingly imagined than 1980s cinematography could ever allow.